August 15, 2016

Rustom Review






A decorated naval officer, his lonely beautiful wife and a Casanova all are set in a backdrop of 69’s posh Bombay neighborhood. Sounds quite exciting..


Akshay Kumar’s latest release Rustom is about a real life account of adultery, conspiracy and those three bullets that shook the entire nation. The case of KM Nanavati vs the State of Maharashtra — or simply, the Nanavati case as we know it — had the city of Bombay in thrall when it unfolded over three years, starting in the late 1950s.

 This Friday, 12 August, Akshay Kumar's Rustom attempted to bring to the screen once again (films like Yeh Rastey Hain Pyar Ke in 1963 and Achanak in 1973, had done it previously) the story of Commander KM Nanavti, his wife Sylvia and her lover Prem Ahuja.  



Story: Rustom Parvi (Akshay Kumar) is a respectful naval officer who reaches to Bombay couple of days earlier from his scheduled six-month long duty at sea. Reaching home, he could not find his wife Cynthia (Ileana D Cruz) at home as was informed she was with Prem Makhija (Arjan Bajwa). Rustom found love letters, gifts, sent to his wife from Prem who was known for his womanizer nature. Rustom felt dejected. Rustom shot Prem at his home and then surrenders. He is tried before a jury. 

At its core, the case seemed simple: A cheated husband shot the lover of his wife, and turned himself in to the police. However, it wasn't that simple.

A flamboyant newspaper editor who was on Rustom’s side influenced the public and jury, also whips up an open and shut case. And Inspector Vincent Lobo (Pawan Malhotra) suspected there is also a mysterious plot which was the also a reason to kill Prem.



What hot: The script has a good grip in terms of narrating the story and succeeds in keeping alive the intrigue factor. Akshay Kumar always looks convincing in a patriotic role. Akshay Kumar is every inch the patriotic Naval Commander and a husband who is passionately in love with his wife. With his measured speech, mannerisms and a dignified composure, he nails it in the courtroom scenes.



What’s not: The second half, which is set almost entirely in a courtroom, has more vigor. There is much over acting of Sachin Khedekar as Public Prosecutor, Anang Desai as Judge and Usha Nadkarni, playing Rustom’s house cleaner. The scene where the jury ponders over the outcome of the case has been handled clumsily and looks extremely tacky.

Film’s another lead Esha Gupta, playing Vikram’s sister, unnecessarily keeps making pouting and narrowing her eyes gave me a feeling that she took an inspiration from Angelina Jolie in Maleficent. 

Overall, Rustom has all the ingredients to be a good thriller, and largely has been successful.  


No comments:

Post a Comment